Lynn Library

Here, we share updates from our work at Lynn – from announcements, award wins to case studies of how we effectively use behavioural science and misinformation strategy to create and implement campaigns that improve and save lives.

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Stuck at the till and fancy a chocolate to go? You look around but there’s no chocolate in sight – instead packets of nuts and fruit line the checkout shelves. Okay, that’ll do. You pop through two packets of nuts and a piece of fruit to your basket and proceed to checkout. Sound familiar?

Companies such as Facebook and Google are paving the way in AI marketing by putting it to work targeting potential customers with personalised targeted ads.

Choice architecture describes the way in which our decisions are influenced by the presentation of choices, like those chocolate bars or those online magazine subscriptions. The choice architect is the policy maker, decision maker, or whoever is in charge who is able to frame information in a particular format, to get their customer to behave in a certain way.

Behavioural design is about influencing and changing the behaviour of your customers, so they make better decisions, it incorporates how people think and how this influences their decision making. Humans are mostly linear thinkers, we complete tasks the way we have always done them out of convenience.

Behavioural design is about influencing and changing the behaviour of your customers, so they make better decisions, it incorporates how people think and how this influences their decision making. Humans are mostly linear thinkers, we complete tasks the way we have always done them out of convenience.

Despite having a huge PR apparatus behind it, the political persuasion industry has been found wanting in its effectiveness. A huge U.S study from 2017 concluded that political campaigns were having ‘minimal persuasive effects’. To understand where our industry can do better, we need to know why it’s so hard.

The Scottish Occupational Road Safety Alliance (ScORSA) has commissioned Lynn PR to deliver a behavioural audit of their website.

Hope. For many of us, over the course of the pandemic, it’s been in fairly short supply.

Almost 40 years ago, in 1984, the now world-renowned researcher Robert Cialdini published his book ‘Influence – The Psychology of Persuasion’. This is the book in which he first presented his six principles of persuasion.

Lynn PR is excited to announce the addition of David Gallagher to its team for 2022. The former Omnicom international president will join Lynn PR as a Non-Executive Director and support the business in its continued growth and entry into new markets.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) has commissioned Lynn PR to deliver behavioural science research into novice riders in the UK.

Almost 40 years ago, in 1984, the now world-renowned researcher Robert Cialdini published his book ‘Influence – The Psychology of Persuasion’. This is the book in which he first presented his six principles of persuasion.

Monday 22 November, the Misinformation Cell held its first, sell out webinar – 'In conversation with the Misinformation Cell' – where our CEO Shayoni Lynn and our Head of Misinformation Cell Stefan Rollnick sat down to try to demystify mis and disinformation. If you want to make sure you’re first in the queue for our next one, you can sign up for Misinformation Cell updates here.

Lynn PR’s behavioural science approach to communications has been recognised, once again, as sector-leading, earning Lynn PR client, Thom Burn and Hertfordshire Health Protection Forum, the Public Service Communications Excellence Award 2021 for the #SaveOurSummer Campaign at the Public Service Communications Academy 2021. The awards allow public sector communicators from across the country to come together, develop key skills and share ideas.

People only notice something when it stands out to them; otherwise, it is almost invisible. A simple example of this is when you decide to look for a particular make of car, and then you start to see these everywhere. The number of these cars has not suddenly increased. They were always there. It is just your attention to them that has altered. This make of car is now the most noticeable and relevant thing to you. It is salient, so your brain 'looks' for it. This is an example of where salience has been brought about by shifting attention to a specific feature.