Lynn Library

Here, we share updates from our work at Lynn – from announcements, award wins to case studies of how we effectively use behavioural science and misinformation strategy to create and implement campaigns that improve and save lives.

Tag: information

news

Industry veteran David Gallagher joins Lynn

Lynn PR is excited to announce the addition of David Gallagher to its team for 2022. The former Omnicom international president will join Lynn PR as a Non-Executive Director and support the business in its continued growth and entry into new markets.

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articles

Misinformation Cell webinar round up: Making sense of misinformation

Monday 22 November, the Misinformation Cell held its first, sell out webinar – ‘In conversation with the Misinformation Cell’ – where our CEO Shayoni Lynn and our Head of Misinformation Cell Stefan Rollnick sat down to try to demystify mis and disinformation. If you want to make sure you’re first in the queue for our next one, you can sign up for Misinformation Cell updates here.

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news

Lynn Digital Campaign recognised by GCS’ Public Service Communications Excellence Award

Lynn PR’s behavioural science approach to communications has been recognised, once again, as sector-leading, earning Lynn PR client, Thom Burn and Hertfordshire Health Protection Forum, the Public Service Communications Excellence Award 2021 for the #SaveOurSummer Campaign at the Public Service Communications Academy 2021. The awards allow public sector communicators from across the country to come together, develop key skills and share ideas.

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articles

Making sense of misinformation part three: Is misinformation getting worse?

Is misinformation getting worse? The short answer is yes. The misinformation challenge has grown over the last ten years for a variety of reasons. Probably the most significant change over the last two decades has been our ‘information environment’. While the vast majority of us once got our news from a small number of common, trusted sources, billions of people around the world are now getting their news through their news feeds on social media. This ‘news’ can be produced by anyone, anywhere in the world. Importantly, with the new tools in web design and the platform provided by social media, it’s easy to produce content that has the look and feel of reliable, mainstream news.

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articles

Making sense of misinformation part two: Why are people falling for misinformation?

The reasons why people fall for misinformation fall on a spectrum: from non-political reasons to intensely political. Misinformation is often believed by people who lack knowledge/expertise in a particular field, people suffering with anxiety about a particular topic (e.g. health anxiety), as well as people who passively scroll through social media to find news instead of deliberately seeking it out from trusted outlets.

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articles

Making sense of misinformation part one: What is misinformation?

The rise of misinformation in our society has been supercharged by what academics call ‘information overload’, which means our brains are processing more information than they can handle, often leaving us in a state of overwhelm, making us more vulnerable to misinformation. So, if you sometimes find yourself thinking back to the political earthquakes of 2016 and feeling like the years since then have been a blur, it’s no accident. 

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